Updated Report on State Policy Efforts to Expand Access to Contraception in Pharmacies

Free 22-page report describing the current landscape of direct pharmacy access to contraception in pharmacies, state policy approaches and experiences, as well as implementation.

The 2020 report includes information for policy efforts in 2020, along with emphasis on definitions of reimbursement vs. payment and a new appendix with model bill elements. 

Sex & Gender 101

Sex and Gender 101 Katie Hood

I recently had the opportunity to attend the Sex & Gender 101 webinar designed to help anyone in the healthcare field learn more about creating trans inclusive care. It is crucial to create an environment that is inclusive because trans people – especially trans people of color – face many barriers to healthcare.

We have all had doctor’s appointments where we were required to fill out a form and check one of two boxes to describe our gender: male or female. For someone who is not cisgender, or someone whose sense of personal identity and gender does not correspond with their birth sex, this can immediately cause feelings anxiety and mistrust before the appointment even starts.

When we look at gender beyond the binary, we find that there are many identities that comprise a person. The first identity that should be recognized is a person’s pronouns; most commonly, we might think of she/her and he/him pronouns, but there are other pronouns like they/them, ze/zir, or others that someone may decide most accurately represents them. It is important to respect and use a person’s preferred pronouns and to understand that we cannot infer other aspects of a person’s identity based on their pronouns.

Another identity that may be important to recognize in the healthcare setting is sex assigned at birth. Like gender, sex assigned at birth is also commonly thought of as binary: male or female. However, people could also be intersex, meaning their genetics and/or anatomy may not fit into the traditional male or female boxes.

Coming back to gender, the typical male and female boxes should be expanded to include, at a minimum, nonbinary. The term nonbinary is a specific gender identity label and an umbrella term. Whether specific or general, this word refers to anyone whose gender is somewhere outside of a strict gender binary. Not all nonbinary people consider themselves to be transgender, but the definition of transgender used here does include nonbinary people.

Gender expression is an identity that may align with someone’s gender but does not have to. People belonging to any gender have the freedom to present themselves in manners that are feminine, masculine, both, or neither. Like pronouns, we cannot assume the other identities of a person based on their gender expression.

The last two identities are sexual attraction and romantic attraction, which, like gender and gender expression, could be the same or different.

I hope that like me, you were able to learn something about gender identities. If you are a healthcare professional, I challenge you to make changes to your practice that will create a more inclusive space for people of all identities.

 

For more information about this training program, visit https://www.innovating-education.org/course/gender-inclusive-care/.



About the AuthorKatie Hood

Katie Hood, PharmD Candidate is a pharmacy student in the Class of 2021 at Shenandoah University Bernard J. Dunn School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Katie completed an elective APPE rotation with Birth Control Pharmacist.

Levonorgestrel Intrauterine Device for Emergency Contraception

Levonorgestrel IUD for EC

A New Emergency Contraception Option

A recent study set out to assess the one-month pregnancy risk with the levonorgestrel 52-mg intrauterine device (IUD, Liletta®) as compared with the copper IUD (Paragard®) for emergency contraception (EC). The study included adults up to 35 years old who requested EC after unprotected sexual intercourse. Unprotected sexual intercourse must have occurred within the previous five days, but participants were not excluded if unprotected sexual intercourse also occurred up to 14 days prior. Participants were instructed to follow-up one month after IUD insertion for a urine pregnancy test, but even if they did not follow-up, their medical records for the following six months were reviewed to verify if a pregnancy was ever detected.1

 

Why the Levonorgestrel IUD?

Although not currently approved by the FDA for EC, the copper IUD, has substantial evidence supporting its use for EC. The failure rate of the copper IUD as EC is much lower than that of oral EC options.2-4 However, when compared to the copper IUD, the levonorgestrel IUD is more popular for long-term contraception, likely due to its other benefits, including decreased menstrual bleeding and pain.5-7

 

Failure Rates and Adverse Events

Of 638 total participants who received an IUD, only one patient experienced an EC failure. The patient had received a levonorgestrel IUD and the pregnancy ended in a spontaneous abortion at ten weeks with the IUD still in place. Statistical analysis of the data showed that the levonorgestrel 52-mg IUD was non-inferior to the copper IUD as EC. Rates of adverse events that required medical attention during the first month of IUD use were similar among both groups and very low overall.1

 

What Does This Mean for Patients?

This evidence means there is a new highly effective option for patients seeking EC and ongoing long-term contraception within five days of unprotected sexual intercourse. Although Liletta® was the levonorgestrel IUD used in this study, Mirena® is another levonorgestrel 52-mg IUD that releases the same daily dose of levonorgestrel. Other levonorgestrel IUDs release varying amounts of levonorgestrel, so we cannot necessarily expand these results to other options at this time. It is also possible the levonorgestrel IUD could be effective in preventing pregnancy when used up to 14 days after unprotected sexual intercourse, but more research is needed in this patient population.1

 

What Does This Mean for Pharmacists?

Pharmacists should be aware of this new option when counseling and referring patients who request EC after unprotected sexual intercourse. Of course, pharmacists should also know when it would be appropriate to utilize other EC options and if their state allows them to prescribe oral EC.

 

For more information: 

References

  1. Turok DK, Gero A, Simmons RG, et al. Levonorgestrel vs. copper intrauterine devices for emergency contraception. N Engl J Med. 2021; 384:335-44.
  2. Cleland K, Zhu H, Goldstuck N, et al. The efficacy of intrauterine devices for emergency contraception: a systematic review of 35 years of experience. Hum Reprod. 2012; 27:1994-2000.
  3. Glasier AF, Cameron ST, Fine PM, et al. Ulipristal acetate versus levonorgestrel for emergency contraception: a randomized non-inferiority trial and meta-analysis. Lancet. 2010; 375:555-62.
  4. von Hertzen H, Piaggio G, Ding J, et al. Low dose mifepristone and two regimens of levonorgestrel for emergency contraception: a WHO multicenter randomized trial. Lancet. 2002; 360:1803-10.
  5. Diedrich JT, Desai S, Zhao Q, et al. Association of short-term bleeding and cramping patterns with long-acting reversible contraceptive method satisfaction. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2015; 212:50-8.
  6. Sanders JN, Myers K, Gawron LM, et al. Contraceptive method use during the community wide HER Salt Lake contraceptive initiative. Am J Public Health. 2018; 108:550-6.
  7. Peipert JF, Zhao Q, Allsworth JE, et al. Continuation and satisfaction of reversible contraception. Obstet Gynecol. 2011; 117:1105-13.


About the AuthorKatie Hood

Katie Hood, PharmD Candidate is a pharmacy student in the Class of 2021 at Shenandoah University Bernard J. Dunn School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Katie completed an elective APPE rotation with Birth Control Pharmacist.

Medication Abortion Curriculum: A Pharmacy Student Perspective

The topics of reproductive health and particularly abortion remains stigmatized in today’s society despite 1 in 4 women having an abortion in their lifetime. Pharmacy school curriculums across the nation reflect this predicament, since abortion is omitted in the standard curriculum of many, if not all, pharmacy schools. Which brings up a question of how knowledgeable are student pharmacists, future medication specialists, with this subject?

Medication Abortion Curriculum was developed by the expert pharmacy educators at Birth Control Pharmacist in an attempt to better familiarize pharmacy students with the topic of medication abortion. This open access curriculum is a PowerPoint deck that is intended to be added or incorporated within a standard, larger lecture such as contraception. The slides provide the basics on medication abortion and prepare pharmacy students to dispense medications and counsel patients appropriately.

Medication abortion with a regimen of mifepristone and misoprostol has been shown to be safe and effective for decades, and is becoming increasingly utilized and acceptable to women across the world.1 Despite the growing use of these medications to induce termination of early pregnancy, the U.S. pharmacist involvement in abortion care is currently limited due to FDA imposed restrictions on how mifepristone can be distributed and dispensed.2 However, in some countries both medications are allowed to be dispensed by pharmacies rather than being limited to clinics and doctor’s offices, improving accessibility for people in need.3,4 Current research has shown great benefits of expanding the types of clinicians providing services, which may eventually lead to FDA lifting unnecessary restrictions to increase access to medication abortion through pharmacies.5

Diversification of skills and areas of expertise is necessary for any future pharmacists who want to stay relevant in tomorrow’s healthcare. Pharmacists need to be prepared to dispense and counsel on misoprostol now and may be able to offer additional patient-centered care in the future. For these reasons, pharmacists should be capable of providing patients with sufficient information, education, and safe and convenient care.

If you’re a pharmacy educator or a student who wants to advocate for medication abortion to be included in your school’s curriculum, check out the slide deck on the Resources page under Pharmacist Education and Training. 

Medication Abortion Curriculum Open Access for Pharmacy Educators

References

  1. Beaman J, Prifti C, Schwarz EB, et al. Medication to Manage Abortion and Miscarriage. J Gen Intern Med. 2020;35(8):2398-2405. doi:10.1007/s11606-020-05836-9.
  2. Raifman S, Orlando M, Rafie S, et al. Medication abortion: Potential for improved patient access through pharmacies. J Am Pharm Assoc (2003). 2018;58(4):377-381.doi:10.1016/j.japh.2018.04.011.
  3. Tamang A, Puri M, Masud S, et al. Medical abortion can be provided safely and effectively
    by pharmacy workers trained within a harm reduction framework: Nepal. Contraception. 2018;97(2):137-143. doi:10.1016/j.contraception.2017.09.004.
  4. Rogers C, Sapkota S, Paudel R, et al. Medical abortion in Nepal: a qualitative study on women’s experiences at safe abortion services and pharmacies. Reprod Health. 2019;16(1):105. doi:10.1186/s12978-019-0755-0.
  5. Weaver G, Schiavon R, Collado ME, et al. Misoprostol knowledge and distribution in Mexico City after the change in abortion law: a survey of pharmacy staff. BMJ Sex Reprod Health. 2019;46(1):46-50. doi:10.1136/bmjsrh-2019-200394.


About the AuthorEugenia

Eugenia A. Haire, PharmD Candidate is a pharmacy student in the Class of 2021 at the Shenandoah University Bernard J. Dunn School of Pharmacy. Eugenia completed an elective APPE rotation with Birth Control Pharmacist.

Outreach Initiative to Expand Access to Depot Medroxyprogesterone Acetate (DMPA)

DMPA Outreach Study Infographic

Why Expand Access to DMPA

The novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) presented many downstream challenges in healthcare throughout 2020. An area of particular interest was the impact COVID-19 had on access to hormonal contraception, specifically DMPA intramuscular (DMPA-IM). Prior to the pandemic, patients who used DMPA-IM would attend approximately four clinic visits per year (every 12 weeks) to obtain their injection from a medical professional.

As public health risks continued to be a primary concern and shelter-in-place orders were issued, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued waivers under section 1135 of the Social Security Act, which permitted state governments to adjust their public health responses to the pandemic as they deemed fit. One way Medi-Cal used this waiver was to cover self-administered DMPA subcutaneous (DMPA-SC) without a prior authorization so patients could continue using their preferred method of hormonal contraception while decreasing exposure to COVID-19 until further notice.

Our study explored interest in at-home, self-administered DMPA-SC among patients who had been on DMPA-IM at an urban, hospital-based safety-net primary care clinic in San Francisco. 

Approach to Patient Outreach 

Our team consisted of medical and pharmacy students, pharmacists, and medical doctors. We identified patients who had been on DMPA-IM within the last nine months (August 2019-May 2020) by searching the clinic’s electronic medical records. Through this process, we identified 90 patients and successfully reached 70 patients (78%) by telephone. Our patients were all on Medi-Cal or Family PACT. Additionally, our patient base was largely non-English speaking, so interpretative services were utilized for effective, patient-preferred communication. Once each patient’s identity was confirmed, we explained self-administered DMPA-SC and answered any questions posed by the patient. If the patient expressed interest in DMPA-SC, we ordered a prescription to their community pharmacy and offered telehealth appointments to answer any further questions, demonstrate how to self-inject, and/or observe the patient as they self-administered. Of the 70 patients reached, 26 patients (37%) were interested in learning more about DMPA-SC. By the end of our study, 15 patients (21%) successfully self-administered DMPA-SC or had a family member or friend do it for them.  

Clinical Implications

Feedback received from patients previously utilizing DMPA-IM suggests at-home administration of DMPA-SC is a viable option when selecting a hormonal contraceptive. By continuing to advocate for at-home administration, the medical community can help expand access to hormonal contraception for all patients.  

 

Check out the full study here

References

  1. Depo-SubQ Provera 104 prescribing information. Pfizer, December 2020. Link. Accessed February 25, 2021. 
  2. Katz M, Newmark RL, Aronstam A, O’Grady N, Strome S, Rafie S, et al. An implementation project to expand access to self-administered depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA). Contraception. 2020;102(6):392-5. DOI

Birth Control Pharmacist Sara Strome Headshot
About the Author

Sara Strome, PharmD Candidate is a pharmacy student in the Class of 2022 at the University of California San Francisco School of Pharmacy.

Webinar Introduces Pharmacists to New Hormonal Contraceptives

New drugs are constantly being approved by the FDA, and it is important for practicing pharmacists to stay up to date on new contraceptives. There are now over 50 unique contraceptives available, and pharmacists need to be aware of these and incorporate them into their practices. Birth Control Pharmacist recently hosted a webinar that aimed to educate pharmacists, pharmacy staff members, and other healthcare providers to feel more comfortable with the new contraceptive options they could prescribe or dispense.

The faculty speaker, Shareen El-Ibiary, PharmD, BCPS, FCCP, is a professor and chair of the Department of Pharmacy Practice at Midwestern University, College of Pharmacy. She is also a consultant for Birth Control Pharmacist.

The program focused on three new hormonal contraceptives – Annovera, Twirla, and Slynd – along with one new nonhormonal contraceptive – Phexxi.

What is Annovera?

Annovera is a new contraceptive vaginal ring that contains segesterone and ethinyl estradiol. It is different from NuvaRing because it is used for 13 consecutive cycles, as opposed to just one cycle. It is not refrigerated.

What is Twirla?

Twirla is a new contraceptive patch that contains levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol. It is very similar to Xulane in terms of application, but Twirla has lower rates of headache, nausea, and breast tenderness.

What is Slynd?

Slynd is a new progestin-only oral contraceptive that contains drospirenone. In each pack of 28 tablets, there are 24 active tablets and four inactive tablets. The main benefit of Slynd over norethindrone is less opportunity for missed doses. Unlike norethindrone’s 3-hour window to take a dose, patients on Slynd have up to a 24-hour window to take a dose before it is considered a missed dose. Pharmacists need to be aware of the unique drug interactions associated with Slynd.

What is Phexxi?

Phexxi is a new prescription-only contraceptive gel that does not contain nonoxynol-9. Instead, it contains lactic acid, citric acid, and potassium bitartrate. Phexxi should be applied vaginally within one hour before each episode of intercourse. It should not be used by patients who have recurrent urinary tract infections or urinary tract abnormalities.

Dr. El-Ibiary wrapped up the program by reviewing patient cases, and she even demonstrated a patient interaction within a pharmacy. This helped bring the concepts from the lecture portion to life and allowed participants to practice incorporating these new hormonal contraceptive into their counseling and other practices.

Fortunately, if you missed the webinar, the video recording and materials are available for home study online at https://birthcontrolpharmacist.com/newhc/. The course material is available to all, with pharmacists having the opportunity to obtain Continuing Pharmacy Education credit. This material provides education to participants to increase their comfort in prescribing, dispensing, or counseling patients on the new contraceptive options available.

Participants provided feedback at the conclusion. Keep reading to see their positive reviews and gain a better idea of what to expect from the online course:

 “As a P1, I appreciate how Dr. El-Ibiary explained everything clearly. It helped me better understand the content and I now have a much better understanding of contraceptives.”

“Very practical, real-life patient case scenarios were used as effective teaching points.”

“Amazing presentation. Very informative and easy to follow.”

“Thank you for providing this CE! It was both helpful & thorough.”

New Hormonal Contraceptives Home Study CPE


Katie HoodAbout the Author

Katie Hood, PharmD Candidate is a pharmacy student in the Class of 2021 at Shenandoah University Bernard J. Dunn School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Katie completed an elective APPE rotation with Birth Control Pharmacist.

Webinar Equips Pharmacists to Provide Contraception Care During COVID-19

During the COVID-19 worldwide pandemic it has been quite the adjustment to deliver safe and quality patient care. Specifically, for contraception care, pharmacists have been working extra hard to continue their direct patient care with how accessible they are. Birth Control Pharmacist recently hosted a webinar that facilitated an educational program and discussion for pharmacy staff members to feel more equipped to deliver contraception and emergency contraception services during COVID-19.

We had multiple speakers of diverse backgrounds in order to give different perspectives on the effects of COVID-19 on contraception care and how pharmacists can best help their patients. The panel speakers were Jennifer Karlin, MD, PhD an attending physician in Family & Community Medicine at UC Davis and Sonya Frausto, PharmD who is the pharmacist-in-charge at Ten Acres Pharmacy, an independent community pharmacy.

What is the healthcare landscape during the COVID-19 pandemic?

Laying out the landscape during the COVID-19 pandemic helped paint a picture to participants about the extensive effects on contraception care. Whether that be loss of insurance or fear of infection from going to healthcare facilities, it highlighted how important it can be for pharmacists to assist their patients with contraception while following national guidelines.

How can pharmacists prescribe birth control safely?

National guidelines covered prescribing birth control and also social distancing to reduce the risk of spreading the virus. Telehealth has been a useful service in adhering to social distancing, while also maintaining face-to-face encounters. This helps patients maintain a personal relationship with their pharmacist.

What are some best practices within the pharmacy?

There are many useful suggestions throughout the webinar, but a useful tool they referenced is the Contraceptive Care Best Practices During COVID-19 best practices guide for pharmacies created by Birth Control Pharmacist.

Dr. Frausto wrapped up the program by reviewing useful tools and resources to use while in the pharmacy. Then she demonstrated a patient interaction within a pharmacy. This helped really bring the whole webinar together with a real-world example and solidified that this webinar is well worth the watch.

Fortunately, if you missed the webinar, the video recording and materials are available for home study online at https://birthcontrolpharmacist.com/careduringcovid/. The course material is available to all, with pharmacists having an opportunity to obtain Continuing Pharmacy Education credit. This material provides education to participants to increase their comfort in providing contraception care, including prescribing hormonal contraception, in community pharmacies during the COVID-19 public health emergency.

Participants provided feedback at the conclusion. Keep reading to see their positive reviews and gain a better idea of what to expect from the online course:

“I loved this CE. Very informative, the speakers were great and passionate about the topic!

“As a newer pharmacist, this type of information helps me to feel better prepared to provide these kinds of services to patients.

“Loved the topic, very timely for COVID.”

“I was coming from a state where pharmacists did not prescribe birth control so this was a new perspective for me.”

pharmacy-based-contraception-care-during-covid-19-online-cpe-program-1


About the Author

Samantha ThompsonSamantha Thompson, PharmD Candidate is a pharmacy student in the Class of 2023 at University of California San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Samantha completed a summer internship with Birth Control Pharmacist.

Putting Policy into Practice: Contraception Care in San Francisco Pharmacies

Contraception Care in San Francisco Pharmacies

What makes some pharmacies more successful than others at implementing pharmacist-prescribed contraception care? To answer this question, we conducted a study to determine the extent of hormonal contraceptive prescribing, also referred to as furnishing in California, among San Francisco community pharmacies, and identify the factors that led to successful implementation.

Implementation in San Francisco pharmacies 

After calling all 113 community and independent pharmacies located in San Francisco, we identified 21 locations (19%) that furnished hormonal contraception. Only one of these was an independent pharmacy; the rest were chain community pharmacies. Half or more of Costco, CVS, and Safeway locations furnished hormonal contraception, while less than 5% of Walgreens and independent pharmacies did so. 

Factors associated with successful adoption

Within the control of pharmacies

We identified three main factors that led to successful implementation that were within pharmacy control. The first was a company protocol—respondents stated that having an established precedent and administrative support, and paying for pharmacists’ training, was crucial for successful implementation. The second was advertising, due to the community’s limited awareness of this service. Lastly, the accessibility of pharmacists played a role in increasing access to services and to hormonal contraception. 

Relating to the setting or larger community

We also identified factors leading to successful implementation outside the control of pharmacies. These included the location of the pharmacy and its patient population, as well as collaboration with local clinics. Pharmacies in proximity to students and other younger and short-term residents found there was more need for hormonal contraceptive furnishing services. One pharmacy had an existing collaboration with a local clinic and its providers that acted as a bridge to the service. 

Barriers to service adoption 

Respondents also reported several barriers to successful implementation. The cost of consultation for patients was a widespread concern. Lack of time was another barrier reported by many pharmacists, which could be resolved through scheduled appointments or more overlaps of pharmacist shifts. The last identified barrier was patient privacy. Many respondents expressed a need for a private consultation room in order to provide a confidential service, and those that had a private consultation room acknowledged this as a benefit. 

Effect of COVID-19 on furnishing 

Our data collection began in April 2020, shortly after the introduction of San Francisco’s shelter-in-place order. We asked study participants to comment on whether practices or demand for hormonal contraception had changed under the shelter-in-place order and responses were mixed. While some pharmacies reported an increase in demand for hormonal contraceptive furnishing, others reposted a decrease. 

Implications for the future

We found an increase in participation among pharmacies in San Francisco that were furnishing hormonal contraception than previously reported in California overall; 19% in San Francisco in 2020 versus 11% statewide in 2017. This finding could reflect either pharmacies adding this service gradually over time or a local phenomenon. However, CVS pharmacists reported that a new corporate protocol was initiated in 2020, suggesting the higher rate of furnishing we identified could be reflected statewide. Our results detailed successful strategies used by San Francisco community pharmacies that could serve as a model for expanding this service to other pharmacies. In the words of one respondent:

“The pharmacist is the most overtrained and underutilized health care professional we have.”

With more widespread implementation of this service, community pharmacists can increase their scope of practice, improve quality and continuity of care for patients, and expand access to hormonal contraception to improve reproductive health.

Link to the full paper.

References

  1. California Board of Pharmacy 1746.1: Protocol for pharmacists furnishing self- administered hormonal contraception. Link.
  2. Chen L, Lim J, Jeong A, & Apollonio D. Implementation of hormonal contraceptive furnishing in San Francisco community pharmacies, 2020. Journal of American Pharmacists Association. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.japh.2020.07.019
  3. Gomez AM. Availability of pharmacist-prescribed contraception in California, 2017. JAMA. 2017;318(22):2253e2254. 

Chen Lim Jeong ApollonioAbout the Authors

Lauren Chen, Julie Lim, and Asher Jeong are third-year doctoral students at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) School of Pharmacy. Dorie Apollonio is a professor in the UCSF Department of Clinical Pharmacy.

Reducing Maternal Mortality in the United States through Collaboration

Maternal Mortality Blog Post - Birth Control Pharmacist

Healthy childbirth requires education and action prior to conception and should continue throughout the gestation period to monitor for any changes that require immediate medical attention. Approximately 60% of maternal deaths are preventable and family planning has shown to decrease the number of maternal deaths related to pregnancy.1,2 Addressing the heightened rates in the United States requires the collaboration of medical expertise to maximize the health of mothers and their offspring.

California is one of the first states to take an initiative in the common complications that arise during childbirth. The California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative (CMQCC) has backed initiatives surrounding two common complications in childbirth: hemorrhaging and blood pressure. Since early prevention of these two serves as a crucial factor in the mother’s health, the team has created standard procedures through practicing these events through simulation, formulating a method for the measurement of blood loss, and creating an accessible toolkit to treat such events when they arise. The Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center is laying the foundation for protocols that will save a woman’s life during childbirth. Utilizing this expertise has shown benefit based on efforts by the CMQCC and can further be supported by preventative care measures employed by the pharmacist.3

The Pharmacist’s Role in Reducing Maternal Mortality

The pharmacist’s scope of practice can have a significant impact on the rates of maternal mortality in the United States, ranging from preconception care, interventions during pregnancy, and patient education.2 The relationship between unintended pregnancies and maternal mortality suggests that reducing rates of unintended pregnancy would be beneficial in, too, reducing rates of maternal mortality. Pharmacists could also aid in the development of a reproductive life plan (RLP) with patients to firstly aid in pregnancy planning. RLPs involve both partners and “includes goals patients make personally about having or not having children and encourages intentional pregnancy planning.”4 Initiating a conversation about a RLP also serves as an opportunity to address a patient’s health needs. For people who are looking to prevent pregnancy, a pharmacist can aid a patient in choosing a contraceptive method that suits the patient’s lifestyle and preferences. For those who do have intentions to become pregnant in the near future, pharmacists can provide education and counseling on health behaviors that could be harmful to a potential pregnancy.4

The Significance of Collaboration

The role of the pharmacist is continually evolving. In collaboration with other healthcare professionals, pharmacists can lay the groundwork needed to reduce maternal morbidity in the United States. Pregnancy planning and education could allow for the formation of RLPs and reduce the number of unintended pregnancies as well as increase awareness for behaviors that could hinder or advance maternal-infant outcomes. Pharmacists’ intervention in conjunction with the initiatives such as the CMQCC could provide for significant breakthroughs in health and wellness before, during, and after parturition.

References

  1. “Maternal Mortality.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 13 Aug 2020. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/reproductivehealth/maternal-mortality/index.html.
  2. Tsui AO, McDonald-Mosley R, Burke A. Family Planning and the Burden of Unintended Pregnancies. Epidemiologic Reviews. 2010;32(1):152-174.
  3. Montagne, Renee. “To Keep Women from Dying in Childbirth, Look to California.” NPR, 29 July 2018. Available at: https://www.npr.org/2018/07/29/632702896/to-keep-women-from-dying-in-childbirth-look-to-california.
  4. Peters LM, DiPietro Mager NA. Pharmacists’ Provision of Contraception: Established and Emerging Roles. Innov Pharm. 2016;7(3):15.

About the Author

Courtney Smith Headshot
Courtney Smith, PharmD Candidate
is a pharmacy student in the Class of 2024 at Ohio Northern University.

Reviewed by Natalie DiPietro Mager, PharmD, PhD, MPH.

New Webinar Prepares Pharmacists to Provide Reproductive Health Services and Referrals

Pharmacists play a key role in providing health care to patients. Their scope is currently expanding into women’s health, specifically in prescribing birth control. As more states pass legislation to allow pharmacists to prescribe birth control, we are preparing pharmacy staff members with the appropriate knowledge and tools to best assist their patients.

We hosted an exciting webinar, “Meeting Reproductive Health Needs at the Pharmacy” with Provide. Provide is a nonprofit organization with a goal to provide healthcare and social services to patients without bias or judgement. They understand the lack of care for patients experiencing an unintended pregnancy and seek to provide a comfortable environment for people to explore their options. This webinar shed light and helped to educate pharmacists, student pharmacists, and pharmacy technicians about family planning services including birth control access, emergency contraception, and abortion. The program included myths and facts about reproductive health, best practices to combat stigma, and how to connect patients with local resources.

Anna Pfaff and Dr. Sally Rafie led the discussion. Each touching on different subject material and bringing some diverse perspectives to the topic, Dr. Rafie as a pharmacist who also runs Birth Control Pharmacist and Anna as a patient educator who coordinates Provide’s Referrals Program. There are many barriers for different populations, further magnified during the COVID-19 pandemic and Title X restrictions, to obtain family planning services.

One very important objective of the program was preparing pharmacists and pharmacy teams to combat stigma surrounding these services. Pharmacy best practices were provided to address individual, environmental, and structural stigmas. The presenters raised awareness around these issues and shared new practical pharmacy communication guides that pharmacists and pharmacy team members can use in their everyday practices. As an example, Dr. Rafie and Monica Sliwa (a UCSD pharmacy student intern with Birth Control Pharmacist) performed a role play activity to show different approaches to assisting a patient find an emergency contraception method in the pharmacy. They also demonstrated the steps to refer patients for other services using online directories.

Fortunately, if you missed the webinar, the video recording and materials are available for on-demand home study online at https://birthcontrolpharmacist.com/referrals/. The course material is available to all, with pharmacists and pharmacy technicians having an opportunity to obtain Continuing Pharmacy Education credit. This material provides education to pharmacy staff members in reducing stigma in access to reproductive health services.

Participants provided feedback at the conclusion. Keep reading to see their positive reviews and gain a better idea of what to expect from the Newonline course:

“Though not having a place of practice due to being in my 4th year of pharmacy school, I appreciated having these materials that can be utilized in whatever area of practice I’m in. I am interested in a career in women’s health and know that these resources will be valuable to me when transitioning into my career.”

“I love the handout provided, and I learned more about abortion clinics. I feel so much more comfortable about discussing options with patients now.”

“I plan on promoting this initiative and educating my colleagues on reproductive health competencies so that patients in my practicing state will have more options for accessibility.”

Meeting Reproductive Health Needs at the Pharmacy On-Demand Webinar


About the Author

Samantha ThompsonSamantha Thompson, PharmD Candidate is a pharmacy student in the Class of 2023 at University of California San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Samantha completed a summer internship with Birth Control Pharmacist.