Updates in Male Contraceptive Agents

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Male contraceptive agents have been highly anticipated as the next step in contraception innovation. To date, several hormonal agents have been developed and tested for safety and efficacy, with three products: Nesterone with Testosterone gel (NES/T), 11β-methyl-19-nortestosterone dodecylcarbonate (11β-MTNDC), and dimethandrolone undecanoate (DMAU). Currently, NES/T is leading in development and contraceptive ability.[1,2]

NES/T has been formulated as a gel containing Nesterone, also known as segesterone acetate (a “pure” progestin presently found in Annovera) in combination with testosterone. This product has passed phase I and phase IIa trials, and is currently in phase IIb trials with a predicted conclusion date for February 2021.[2] NES/T is formulated as a topical gel that can be applied to the shoulders daily with the drug action of sperm count/development suppression to thresholds that should translate to effective contraception with normal hormonal function.[2]

11β-MTNDC is a 28 day daily use oral tablet formulated to act as similarly to 28 day contraceptive regimens for females. The drug acts as a hormonal suppressant to impair spermatogenesis. It is currently in phase I trials, therefore its extent of efficacy and long term effects is still to be determined.[3]

DMAU is formulated as both a 28 day daily use oral tabletand a long acting injection (dosing frequency to be determined). DMAU has a similar action to 11β-MTNDC, and is also still under early investigation in phase I trials.[4]

Despite the difference in administration routes, these drugs have similar effects on male sex hormones. They suppress brain hormones called “gonadotropins,” which results in profound reduction of endogenous testosterone production. The low levels of testosterone thereby result in a reversible reduction in spermatogenesis within the testicles to the point of sperm development impairment, but not enough to cause lasting hormonal changes as of current trialing.[1] The drugs themselvesact as a supplement in place of the person’s own testosterone to maintain male hormonal functions. Current trialing has noted that each product does have the adverse of effect of minor acne at the beginning of treatment.[2,3,4] Participants also noted their concern with a lack of STI prevention.[5] However, with only low risk adverse effects demonstrated thus far in studies, and participants reporting these methods as “easy” treatment regimens to follow, these products appear acceptable for use in the eyes of the American male population.[2,3]

The utility of these products, if approved, is still being questioned. In one US survey participants stated that they would greatly consider the Nestorone topical gel as a first choice method of contraception. 6 However, based on previous contraceptive studies in the US and the United Arab Emirates, the percentages of men using methods of contraception is roughly 59% and 20% respectively.[7,8] According to a 2017 CDC study on contraception use in the U.S., approximately 42.5 million men (59% of the polled 72 million men in the study) engage in contraception practice.[7] With only just over half of the US male population reporting the use of contraception, it is understandable that drug marketing could be seen as risky to pharmaceutical companies if the products are still only in development.

The major obstacles to further drug development are marketing based support and acknowledgment. With only one major organization funding the research on these products, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, progress is very slow.[1] No major pharmaceutical marketing companies have made any public statements on male contraception as a new drug category, it may take longer than the full trialing time to hear more on product availability in the market.

These novel products, NES/T gel, oral DMAU and 11β-MNTDC, if proven to be effective contraceptive agents, would constitute a suitable alternative for couples that wish to participate in planned parenting, but wish to avoid or cannot use contraceptives indicated for females. Although the rate of progress is slow, it is substantial and the availability of male contraception agents may arrive within the next decade. For more information please follow the link to the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development website (https://www.nichd.nih.gov/).

References

  1. Long JE, Lee MS, Blithe DL. Male Contraceptive Development: Update on Novel Hormonal and Nonhormonal Methods. Clin Chem 2019;65(1):153-160.
  2. Wang C, Page S, Nagia A, et al. Study of Daily Application of Nestorone® (NES) and Testosterone (T) Combination Gel for Male Contraception. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03452111. Dec 11, 2019.
  3. Wu S, Yuen F, Swerdloff RS, et al. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Single-Dose Novel Oral Androgen 11β-Methyl-19-Nortestosterone-17β-Dodecyl carbonate in Men. J Clin Endocrinol Med 2019; 104(3):629-638.
  4. Gava G, Meriggiola M. Update on male hormonal contraception. Ther Adv Endocrinol Metab. 2019;10.
  5. Glasier A. Acceptability of contraception for men: a review. Contraception 2010; 82(5):453-456.
  6. Roth M, Shih G, Ilani N, et al. Acceptability of a transdermal gel-based male hormonal contraceptive in a randomized controlled trial. Contraception 2014;90(4):407-412.
  7. Daniels K., Amba J. Current Contraceptive Status Among Women Aged 15–49: United States, 2015–2017. CDC. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/databriefs/db327.htm. Accessed December 22 2019.
  8. Ghazal-Aswad S, Zaib-Un-Nisa S, Rizik DE, et al. A study on the knowledge and practice of contraception among men in the United Arab Emirates. J Fam Plann Reprod Health Care 2002; 28(4):196-200.
  9.  

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About the Author

Steven Gonzalez PharmD CandidateSteven Gonzalez, PharmD Candidate is a pharmacy student in the Chicago College of Pharmacy Class of 2022 at Midwestern University, with the dream of becoming a successful clinical pharmacist. In his time off, Steven enjoys spending time with his friends and family, going hiking, fishing, and watching classic movies.

Article reviewed by Brooke Griffin, PharmD, BCACP

Endometriosis Basics and How Contraception Can Help

What is endometriosis?

Endometriosis is characterized as a condition in which endometrial tissue, which normally lines the uterus, develops outside of the uterine cavity in abnormal locations such as the ovaries, fallopian tubes and abdominal cavity.1 Endometriosis is a common cause of chronic pelvic pain in women and can sometimes be associated with infertility.2 It is estimated that 1 in 10 women suffer from endometriosis (with percentages even higher in women with chronic pelvic pain and infertility).  On average, it takes anywhere from 3 to 11 years from the onset of pain symptoms for women to be accurately diagnosed with endometriosis.3

As pharmacists, it is important to establish our role in patient care and to be aware of this underdiagnosed condition and the role of hormonal contraception in managing symptoms and the disease. We can assist patients with endometriosis by having confidence in the medication they were prescribed and keeping in mind the individual treatment goals in each patient. While there is no definitive cure for endometriosis, there are pharmacological approaches in the management of the associated pain. While there are many different options available for women with endometriosis, this article will be focusing on the use of hormonal contraceptives in endometriosis pain management. Additionally, it is important to keep in mind that no hormones are free of side effects and severity and tolerability can vary significantly; not all types of endometrial pain respond equally to hormonal treatment.4

 

What is the role of hormonal contraceptives in endometriosis treatment?  

Combined hormonal contraceptives (CHCs) and progesterone only pills (POPs) have been used for pain management associated with endometriosis. Hormonal contraceptives help to slow the growth of new endometrial tissue and may prevent formation of new adhesions which can help decrease the pain patients have. However, hormonal contraceptives will not eradicate any endometrial tissue that currently exists in the patient.5

There are a few differences in tolerability and the level of evidence for each treatment. For assessing the different types of contraceptive treatment for endometriosis, the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) has created a grading scale as part of their justification for treatment:

Grading Scale

Grade A: treatment has been backed by meta-analysis, systemic review or multiple RCTs (high quality). 

Grade B: treatment has been backed by a meta-analysis, systemic review or multiple RCTs (moderate quality), single RCT, large non-randomized trial, case-control or cohort studies (high quality). 

Grade C: treatment has been backed by a single RCT, large non-randomized trial, case-control or cohort studies (moderate quality).4

CHCs may considered as it can reduce endometriosis-associated dyspareunia, dysmenorrhea and non-menstrual pain.4 Oral CHCs are considered “Grade B”.4 It is important to note that endometriosis is considered to be a predominantly estrogen-dependent disease. It is possible that the estrogen component of CHCs may mask the effect of the progestin by possibly activating the disease. However, it has been argued that ethinylestradiol doses are too low to reach an activating threshold.4 According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) guidelines, CHCs showed significant decrease in pain in patients and if that therapy is not tolerated patient could move on to progestins. Unlike the ESHRE, they did not differentiate between types of contraceptives and their related effectiveness.5 

Among the CHCs, it is important to recognize that different dosage forms have different grades of evidence of efficacy in the ESHRE guidelines. Continuous CHCs (active tablets only) were given a “Grade C”.  Vaginal contraceptive rings and transdermal patches were also given a “C”.4

Progestin-only pills are considered “Grade A” by the ESHRE guidelines because they have the most evidence to date in reducing endometriosis-related pain. Additionally, while Levonorgestrel-containing IUDs are not FDA approved as treatment for endometriosis, they are given a “Grade B” as an option to reduce pain related to the disease.4 Additionally, the ACOG guidelines recognize the use of levonogersterol-containing IUDs to reduce endometriosis related pelvic pain, but emphasized that potential side effects like irregular bleeding and weight gain are common.5  

Another type of progestin contraceptive that can be used for endometriosis-associated pain is Depot medroxyprogesterone (DMPA). DMPA works to prevent follicular growth preventing ovulation.6 ACOG recognizes DMPA as a suitable treatment as it has been approved by the FDA for treatment of endometriosis-associated pain.5 Furthermore, ESHRE gave DMPA a “Grade A” as an option to reduce endometriosis-related pain.4

As pharmacists, we serve a vital role in the patient care plan and can be there to help patients recognize the types of treatment options available to them. As a patient, it may be hard navigating through the different contraceptive options that they have for endometriosis pain management. Pharmacists can help patients navigate these options in order to help improve their quality of life.

References

    1. Noncontraceptive benefits of birth control pills: fact sheet. ASRM (American Society for Reproductive Medicine). Available from: https://www.reproductivefacts.org/globalassets/rf/news-and-publications/bookletsfact-sheets/english-fact-sheets-and-info-booklets/noncontraceptive_benefits_of_bcp_factsheet.pdf. Accessed January 16, 2020
    2. Leyland N, Casper R, Laberge P, Singh SS, SOGC. Endometriosis: diagnosis and management. J Obstet Gynaecol Can 2010;7 (Suppl 2):S1–32.
    3. Husby GK, Haugen RS, Moen MH. Diagnostic delay in women with pain and endometriosis. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003;82(7):649–53. 
    4. Dunselman GA, Vermeulen N, Becker C, Calhaz-Jorge C, D’Hooghe T, De Bie B, et, al. ESHRE guideline: management of women with endometriosis. Hum Reprod. 2014;29(3):400-12.
    5. Committee on Gynecologic Practice. ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 114: Management of endometriosis. Obstet Gynecol. 2010;116(1):223–36.
    6. Depo-Provera CI (medroxyprogesterone acetate) [package insert]. U.S Food and Drug Administration website. Revised October 2010. Available from: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2010/020246s036lbl.pdf. Accessed February 10, 2020

About the Author

Breanna HeadshotBreanna Failla, PharmD Candidate is in her second year of pharmacy school at Midwestern University Chicago College of Pharmacy. She serves as APhA-ASP Chapter President and Midyear Regional Meeting Coordinator for Region 4. 

Article reviewed by Brooke Griffin, PharmD, BCACP