Sex & Gender 101

Sex and Gender 101 Katie Hood

I recently had the opportunity to attend the Sex & Gender 101 webinar designed to help anyone in the healthcare field learn more about creating trans inclusive care. It is crucial to create an environment that is inclusive because trans people – especially trans people of color – face many barriers to healthcare.

We have all had doctor’s appointments where we were required to fill out a form and check one of two boxes to describe our gender: male or female. For someone who is not cisgender, or someone whose sense of personal identity and gender does not correspond with their birth sex, this can immediately cause feelings anxiety and mistrust before the appointment even starts.

When we look at gender beyond the binary, we find that there are many identities that comprise a person. The first identity that should be recognized is a person’s pronouns; most commonly, we might think of she/her and he/him pronouns, but there are other pronouns like they/them, ze/zir, or others that someone may decide most accurately represents them. It is important to respect and use a person’s preferred pronouns and to understand that we cannot infer other aspects of a person’s identity based on their pronouns.

Another identity that may be important to recognize in the healthcare setting is sex assigned at birth. Like gender, sex assigned at birth is also commonly thought of as binary: male or female. However, people could also be intersex, meaning their genetics and/or anatomy may not fit into the traditional male or female boxes.

Coming back to gender, the typical male and female boxes should be expanded to include, at a minimum, nonbinary. The term nonbinary is a specific gender identity label and an umbrella term. Whether specific or general, this word refers to anyone whose gender is somewhere outside of a strict gender binary. Not all nonbinary people consider themselves to be transgender, but the definition of transgender used here does include nonbinary people.

Gender expression is an identity that may align with someone’s gender but does not have to. People belonging to any gender have the freedom to present themselves in manners that are feminine, masculine, both, or neither. Like pronouns, we cannot assume the other identities of a person based on their gender expression.

The last two identities are sexual attraction and romantic attraction, which, like gender and gender expression, could be the same or different.

I hope that like me, you were able to learn something about gender identities. If you are a healthcare professional, I challenge you to make changes to your practice that will create a more inclusive space for people of all identities.

 

For more information about this training program, visit https://www.innovating-education.org/course/gender-inclusive-care/.



About the AuthorKatie Hood

Katie Hood, PharmD Candidate is a pharmacy student in the Class of 2021 at Shenandoah University Bernard J. Dunn School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Katie completed an elective APPE rotation with Birth Control Pharmacist.

Webinar Introduces Pharmacists to New Hormonal Contraceptives

New drugs are constantly being approved by the FDA, and it is important for practicing pharmacists to stay up to date on new contraceptives. There are now over 50 unique contraceptives available, and pharmacists need to be aware of these and incorporate them into their practices. Birth Control Pharmacist recently hosted a webinar that aimed to educate pharmacists, pharmacy staff members, and other healthcare providers to feel more comfortable with the new contraceptive options they could prescribe or dispense.

The faculty speaker, Shareen El-Ibiary, PharmD, BCPS, FCCP, is a professor and chair of the Department of Pharmacy Practice at Midwestern University, College of Pharmacy. She is also a consultant for Birth Control Pharmacist.

The program focused on three new hormonal contraceptives – Annovera, Twirla, and Slynd – along with one new nonhormonal contraceptive – Phexxi.

What is Annovera?

Annovera is a new contraceptive vaginal ring that contains segesterone and ethinyl estradiol. It is different from NuvaRing because it is used for 13 consecutive cycles, as opposed to just one cycle. It is not refrigerated.

What is Twirla?

Twirla is a new contraceptive patch that contains levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol. It is very similar to Xulane in terms of application, but Twirla has lower rates of headache, nausea, and breast tenderness.

What is Slynd?

Slynd is a new progestin-only oral contraceptive that contains drospirenone. In each pack of 28 tablets, there are 24 active tablets and four inactive tablets. The main benefit of Slynd over norethindrone is less opportunity for missed doses. Unlike norethindrone’s 3-hour window to take a dose, patients on Slynd have up to a 24-hour window to take a dose before it is considered a missed dose. Pharmacists need to be aware of the unique drug interactions associated with Slynd.

What is Phexxi?

Phexxi is a new prescription-only contraceptive gel that does not contain nonoxynol-9. Instead, it contains lactic acid, citric acid, and potassium bitartrate. Phexxi should be applied vaginally within one hour before each episode of intercourse. It should not be used by patients who have recurrent urinary tract infections or urinary tract abnormalities.

Dr. El-Ibiary wrapped up the program by reviewing patient cases, and she even demonstrated a patient interaction within a pharmacy. This helped bring the concepts from the lecture portion to life and allowed participants to practice incorporating these new hormonal contraceptive into their counseling and other practices.

Fortunately, if you missed the webinar, the video recording and materials are available for home study online at https://birthcontrolpharmacist.com/newhc/. The course material is available to all, with pharmacists having the opportunity to obtain Continuing Pharmacy Education credit. This material provides education to participants to increase their comfort in prescribing, dispensing, or counseling patients on the new contraceptive options available.

Participants provided feedback at the conclusion. Keep reading to see their positive reviews and gain a better idea of what to expect from the online course:

 “As a P1, I appreciate how Dr. El-Ibiary explained everything clearly. It helped me better understand the content and I now have a much better understanding of contraceptives.”

“Very practical, real-life patient case scenarios were used as effective teaching points.”

“Amazing presentation. Very informative and easy to follow.”

“Thank you for providing this CE! It was both helpful & thorough.”

New Hormonal Contraceptives Home Study CPE


Katie HoodAbout the Author

Katie Hood, PharmD Candidate is a pharmacy student in the Class of 2021 at Shenandoah University Bernard J. Dunn School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Katie completed an elective APPE rotation with Birth Control Pharmacist.

Webinar Equips Pharmacists to Provide Contraception Care During COVID-19

During the COVID-19 worldwide pandemic it has been quite the adjustment to deliver safe and quality patient care. Specifically, for contraception care, pharmacists have been working extra hard to continue their direct patient care with how accessible they are. Birth Control Pharmacist recently hosted a webinar that facilitated an educational program and discussion for pharmacy staff members to feel more equipped to deliver contraception and emergency contraception services during COVID-19.

We had multiple speakers of diverse backgrounds in order to give different perspectives on the effects of COVID-19 on contraception care and how pharmacists can best help their patients. The panel speakers were Jennifer Karlin, MD, PhD an attending physician in Family & Community Medicine at UC Davis and Sonya Frausto, PharmD who is the pharmacist-in-charge at Ten Acres Pharmacy, an independent community pharmacy.

What is the healthcare landscape during the COVID-19 pandemic?

Laying out the landscape during the COVID-19 pandemic helped paint a picture to participants about the extensive effects on contraception care. Whether that be loss of insurance or fear of infection from going to healthcare facilities, it highlighted how important it can be for pharmacists to assist their patients with contraception while following national guidelines.

How can pharmacists prescribe birth control safely?

National guidelines covered prescribing birth control and also social distancing to reduce the risk of spreading the virus. Telehealth has been a useful service in adhering to social distancing, while also maintaining face-to-face encounters. This helps patients maintain a personal relationship with their pharmacist.

What are some best practices within the pharmacy?

There are many useful suggestions throughout the webinar, but a useful tool they referenced is the Contraceptive Care Best Practices During COVID-19 best practices guide for pharmacies created by Birth Control Pharmacist.

Dr. Frausto wrapped up the program by reviewing useful tools and resources to use while in the pharmacy. Then she demonstrated a patient interaction within a pharmacy. This helped really bring the whole webinar together with a real-world example and solidified that this webinar is well worth the watch.

Fortunately, if you missed the webinar, the video recording and materials are available for home study online at https://birthcontrolpharmacist.com/careduringcovid/. The course material is available to all, with pharmacists having an opportunity to obtain Continuing Pharmacy Education credit. This material provides education to participants to increase their comfort in providing contraception care, including prescribing hormonal contraception, in community pharmacies during the COVID-19 public health emergency.

Participants provided feedback at the conclusion. Keep reading to see their positive reviews and gain a better idea of what to expect from the online course:

“I loved this CE. Very informative, the speakers were great and passionate about the topic!

“As a newer pharmacist, this type of information helps me to feel better prepared to provide these kinds of services to patients.

“Loved the topic, very timely for COVID.”

“I was coming from a state where pharmacists did not prescribe birth control so this was a new perspective for me.”

pharmacy-based-contraception-care-during-covid-19-online-cpe-program-1


About the Author

Samantha ThompsonSamantha Thompson, PharmD Candidate is a pharmacy student in the Class of 2023 at University of California San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Samantha completed a summer internship with Birth Control Pharmacist.

New Webinar Prepares Pharmacists to Provide Reproductive Health Services and Referrals

Pharmacists play a key role in providing health care to patients. Their scope is currently expanding into women’s health, specifically in prescribing birth control. As more states pass legislation to allow pharmacists to prescribe birth control, we are preparing pharmacy staff members with the appropriate knowledge and tools to best assist their patients.

We hosted an exciting webinar, “Meeting Reproductive Health Needs at the Pharmacy” with Provide. Provide is a nonprofit organization with a goal to provide healthcare and social services to patients without bias or judgement. They understand the lack of care for patients experiencing an unintended pregnancy and seek to provide a comfortable environment for people to explore their options. This webinar shed light and helped to educate pharmacists, student pharmacists, and pharmacy technicians about family planning services including birth control access, emergency contraception, and abortion. The program included myths and facts about reproductive health, best practices to combat stigma, and how to connect patients with local resources.

Anna Pfaff and Dr. Sally Rafie led the discussion. Each touching on different subject material and bringing some diverse perspectives to the topic, Dr. Rafie as a pharmacist who also runs Birth Control Pharmacist and Anna as a patient educator who coordinates Provide’s Referrals Program. There are many barriers for different populations, further magnified during the COVID-19 pandemic and Title X restrictions, to obtain family planning services.

One very important objective of the program was preparing pharmacists and pharmacy teams to combat stigma surrounding these services. Pharmacy best practices were provided to address individual, environmental, and structural stigmas. The presenters raised awareness around these issues and shared new practical pharmacy communication guides that pharmacists and pharmacy team members can use in their everyday practices. As an example, Dr. Rafie and Monica Sliwa (a UCSD pharmacy student intern with Birth Control Pharmacist) performed a role play activity to show different approaches to assisting a patient find an emergency contraception method in the pharmacy. They also demonstrated the steps to refer patients for other services using online directories.

Fortunately, if you missed the webinar, the video recording and materials are available for on-demand home study online at https://birthcontrolpharmacist.com/referrals/. The course material is available to all, with pharmacists and pharmacy technicians having an opportunity to obtain Continuing Pharmacy Education credit. This material provides education to pharmacy staff members in reducing stigma in access to reproductive health services.

Participants provided feedback at the conclusion. Keep reading to see their positive reviews and gain a better idea of what to expect from the Newonline course:

“Though not having a place of practice due to being in my 4th year of pharmacy school, I appreciated having these materials that can be utilized in whatever area of practice I’m in. I am interested in a career in women’s health and know that these resources will be valuable to me when transitioning into my career.”

“I love the handout provided, and I learned more about abortion clinics. I feel so much more comfortable about discussing options with patients now.”

“I plan on promoting this initiative and educating my colleagues on reproductive health competencies so that patients in my practicing state will have more options for accessibility.”

Meeting Reproductive Health Needs at the Pharmacy On-Demand Webinar


About the Author

Samantha ThompsonSamantha Thompson, PharmD Candidate is a pharmacy student in the Class of 2023 at University of California San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Samantha completed a summer internship with Birth Control Pharmacist.